General Information

Henrico County Public Schools

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Accreditation

Henrico County Public Schools (HCPS) are accredited by the Virginia Department of Education

Adding or Dropping High School Courses

Requests to add or drop a course once the school year begins will be considered on a case-by-case basis with administrator approval as space permits.
ADD:
1. No existing HCPS student may add a new, year-long course after the class has been in session for fifteen (15) school days.
2. No existing HCPS student may add a new semester course after the class has been in session for eight (8) school days.

DROP (Dropped courses will not appear on the high school transcript under the following circumstances):
1) Any year-long courses dropped on or before the end of the first nine-weeks’ grading period.
2) Any semester courses dropped on or before the fifth Friday from the first day of school.
3) Any semester courses dropped on or before the fifth Friday from the first day of the second semester.
Any courses dropped after the deadlines listed above will result in one of the following circumstances:
1) “WP” = (Withdrawn Passing)- NOT calculated in student GPA. WP appears on transcript in place of grade.
2) “WF” = (Withdrawn Failing)- NOT calculated in student GPA. WF appears on transcript in place of grade.

Year-long courses may not be dropped after the first Friday in March.
Semester courses may not be dropped after completion of the first nine weeks’ grading period of either semester.

Advanced Placement Examinations

High school students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses may take Advanced Placement College Board exams each May, and depending upon their scores, may be awarded college credit and/or advanced placement at *participating colleges and universities.

Henrico encourages students taking an AP course to sit for the AP exam. Although most students who take the AP examinations are enrolled in exit-level courses with an “AP” designation, any highly motivated student may elect to take an AP exam in the subject area of his/her choice. According to information provided by CollegeBoard, the student’s “learning experience may take the form of an honors class, a strong regular course, a tutorial, or an independent study.”

Advanced Placement Examinations are administered in May of each year by the school’s designated AP Coordinator. In June the examinations are scored by the College Board on a five-point scale: 5 = extremely well-qualified;4 = well-qualified; 3 = qualified; 2 = possibly qualified; and 1 = no recommendation. In July the scores are sent to students, designated colleges, and home schools. *Colleges which participate in the Advanced Placement Examinations Program will then consider full or partial credit for scores of three or better.

For additional information on the Advanced Placement Examinations Program, students should make an appointment with their school counselor or the school’s AP Coordinator. Information concerning financial assistance for exam fees (for those who qualify) is available from their school counselor.

*Students should refer to the catalog from each college or university for information concerning the institution’s AP policies.

Alternative Programs

Henrico County Public Schools offers a variety of nontraditional programs to meet the needs of all students. The following programs provide students with choices in their educational program to be prepared for life in the 21st century.

Note: The HCPS Code of Student Conduct applies to all students participating in any nontraditional program.

Academy at Virginia Randolph

The Academy at Virginia Randolph (AVR) is open to all high school students who want or need an alternate approach to education. In a compassionate atmosphere fostered by a competent and concerned staff, students are encouraged to develop their talents and skills needed to meet the demands of the 21st century as either being employed, enlisted, or pursuing continuing education opportunities following graduation. Assisted by school counselors and instructors, students design their own programs of study to meet their needs and to serve as a foundation for their chosen career. The staff works closely with students and their families to pursue the students’ educational and occupational career goals. School, family, and community involvement are all elements of the program. Students interested in enrolling at the Academy must complete an application signed by a parent and have school counselors supply the required student information. Once the application has been received, applicants will be notified of a required student and parent information session. Additionally, the prospective student and a parent must meet with the vocational instructor to develop a career plan. Acceptance to the Academy is based on space availability.

All students attending AVR will be working toward a standard or advanced high school diploma. Students may also choose to work toward a career and technical education certificate in addition to their high school diploma.

Center for Diversified Studies

The Center for Diversified Studies, located at the Academy at Virginia Randolph, provides personalized programs for students who want to complete their high school education and who, for various reasons, are unable to complete the last few courses required for graduation at their home high school. Options for courses range from college level to career and technical certificate classes. This nontraditional, flexible educational structure may lead to a standard or advanced studies diploma.  The Center’s ultimate goal is to coordinate classes for students in order to help them obtain required credits for graduation. A personalized plan based on each student’s educational and career goals will be implemented to identify where the student will be taking classes. Applications for CDS are available through students’ home school counselors.

Imagine Edgenuity – (Online Courses)

Imagine Edgenuity is designed to allow students to fulfill graduation requirements through a web-based program aligned with the Virginia and Henrico County Public Schools curriculum. The credit recovery program serves students who may not have successfully earned credit in the traditional classroom setting, may be under-credit, or may need a differentiated instructional delivery method.  Students enrolled in the program will take online core content courses in the areas of English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies.  Imagine Edgenuity does offer a limited number of elective courses.  All courses must be completed within the prescribed time frame and are monitored by a licensed teacher. Grades earned through the program are reflected on the student transcript.

Prior to enrolling in an Imagine Edgenuity course, all students must first complete a student agreement contract. The student agreement explains the logistics of the program and requires parent/guardian consent. Students should also have access to the internet and a laptop.

Evening School of Excellence

The Evening School of Excellence primarily serves high school students who have experienced academic difficulties, personal challenges, and/or are at-risk of not graduating on time.  Designed to help students get back on track to graduation, the program provides an opportunity for students to complete coursework and recover credits needed for graduation through evening classes.  The instructional program addresses the learning styles of students through smaller classes, more individualized attention, and differentiated teaching strategies.

Evening School of Excellence courses take place via virtual, synchronous classroom instruction. This instructional format allows the program to serve students across the county.  Please note there are portions of some courses where the curriculum must be taught in person.  Students are notified by their teachers regarding when in person instruction format is required.

Individual Student Alternative Education Plan (ISAEP) Program

The ISAEP Program offers high school students the opportunity to earn a high school equivalency certificate by preparing for, and attempting, the General Education Development (GED®) battery of tests. Featuring a unique half-day schedule, students are given individualized instruction in a small group setting. 

  • Serves eligible students who are between the ages of 16.5 and 18.
  • Targets students with strong academic skills who have not been successful in a traditional school setting
  • Provides instruction in preparation for the GED® battery of tests
  • Provides access to the Official GED battery of tests
  • Provides career counseling and occupational skills training through participation in work-based learning and exploration of post-secondary opportunities
  • Requires an application, assessment testing, mandatory orientation and adherence to attendance requirements.

Program for Academic and Career Empowerment at Virginia Randolph (PACE) 

PACE is a nontraditional program that serves over-age middle school students. The program is designed to remediate students and allow them to experience success with their peer group in high school the following school year. This unique program provides students with small class sizes, an individualized learning plan, faculty mentorship, blended online curriculum, and project-based learning steeped in collaboration, problem solving, critical thinking, and innovation. Students also explore electives and earn three high school credits.

Eighth grade students who are one or more years over-age are eligible for the program. All overage students, 14 years or older,  will be reviewed and recommended to the program by their comprehensive middle school. Overage students will be enrolled in PACE with the intent of returning to the comprehensive high school or the Academy at Virginia Randolph with three to five high school credits the following year.

Career and Technical Education (CTE)

Career and Technical Education (CTE) coursework is available in all HCPS middle and high schools and prepares students to be enrolled in the college of their choice, enlisted in the military, or employed in the career they have trained for. CTE programs are designed to contribute to the broad educational achievement of students, including the development of academic, technical, and work readiness skills (the ability to work independently and as part of a team, think creatively, solve problems, and utilize technology). Students who complete CTE programs are prepared for a successful transition into postsecondary education and work. All CTE courses include tasks/competencies to be achieved, student performance objectives for each of the tasks/competencies, criterion-referenced measures for evaluating performance, and formal procedures for documentation. Opportunities are available for students to earn college credits through selected courses and to prepare for licensure and/or industry certifications related to their programs of study.

Code RVA

CodeRVA is a regional public high school, which opened in September 2017. The school’s design builds on Next Generation school models across the nation that rethink the use of time and space, leverage technology to advance learning, personalize learning experiences, and redesign curriculum to align with competency-based progressions.

Focused on computer science, the school offers the opportunity to complete high school requirements through a combination of blended (online and face-to-face) learning, integrated coursework, and project-based learning.

CodeRVA students are provided an opportunity to graduate with a Virginia high school diploma, an associate’s degree from the community college system, industry certifications, and paid work experience in computer science- related fields.

CodeRVA is designed to meet three specific goals:

  • Redesign the high school experience to better meet the needs of today’s students by reducing seat-time requirements and moving toward competency-based course completion;
  • Address racial, economic, and gender inequities in STEM-related education; and
  • Increase the pool of potential employees in coding and other computer science-related fields for central Virginia.

Each of the participating school divisions in central Virginia are allocated seats proportionally, based on overall membership numbers. Final selection of students is made through an independent, computer-based lottery process. Applications for CodeRVA High School are available through the coderva.org website. For more information, visit the coderva.org website.

College Credit (Earning College Credit while in High School)

HCPS provides college readiness curriculum to students through standard and honors level courses as well as specialty center courses. In addition, students may take advantage of opportunities to earn college credit while enrolled in high school through Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), Dual Enrollment, and Concurrent College Enrollment.

The Advanced Placement (AP) program provides rigorous academic coursework in the major subject fields, with course content designed at the college level. AP courses are open to any student who is interested in academic rigor and meets course prerequisites.

Credit Earned: Students earn a high school credit* by passing the AP course. Students also earn college credit by taking the AP exam and earning a specific score that is determined by each individual college. The AP transfer policy for four-year Virginia public colleges and universities can be viewed at the following link: https://research.schev.edu/enrollment/b10_partc.asp. For information on other colleges or universities, please check their websites.

The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (IB DP) prepares students with college level work, reflection, and character development through the study of six major subgroups and core program elements that emphasize critical thinking, community service, and research and writing skills. Students apply to the high school IB program in eighth grade and progress to the IB DP for 11th and 12th grades.

Credit Earned: Students earn a high school credit* by passing the IB DP course. Students may also earn college credit by taking the IB DP exam and achieving a specific score that is determined by each individual college. General university recognition of IB DP exams and the IB Diploma can be viewed at the following: https://www.ibo.org/university-admission/recognition-of-the-ib-diploma-by-countries-and-universities/. Visit IB’s University Policy Index for self-report recognition policies by college or university at https://www.ibo.org/university-admission/recognition-of-the-ib-diploma-by-countries-and-universities/.

Dual Enrollment allows qualified students to meet requirements for high school graduation while simultaneously earning college credit by taking approved courses through division-wide agreements with Reynolds Community College, John Tyler Community College, ECPI University, Bryant & Stratton, Longwood University and James Madison University. Students participating in the High Tech Academy at the ACE Center at Highland Springs may receive dual enrollment credits from approved Virginia Commonwealth University courses. Students must complete required HCPS paperwork and submit it to their principal for approval prior to enrollment. Dual Enrollment courses become a part of the permanent college transcript, and credit for dual enrollment courses is generally accepted at most Virginia private and public colleges. Students are responsible for verifying the transfer of college credits between one of the colleges/universities listed above and other colleges and universities, as policies may vary. In order to complete Dual Enrollment coursework, students must: (1) discuss interest with their school counselors and complete and submit any required HCPS paperwork for approval; and (2) meet course prerequisites, and; (3) complete and submit the required college/university application process, and; (4) successfully complete college placement tests or approved alternate assessment as required.

In HCPS, students may participate in Dual Enrollment in the three following ways:

  • In-School Dual Enrollment – Eligible high school juniors and seniors may take dual enrollment courses taught at the high school by a college-qualified HCPS teacher or approved community college faculty member. HCPS students/families pay a $50 fee per course, and HCPS pays the remainder of all tuition and fees. Courses offered are limited based on instructor credentialing, existing course offerings, and student interest.


Credit Earned: Students will earn one high school credit for successful completion of six semester hours of college credit and .5 high school credit for successful completion of three semester hours of college credit. The number of college credits with transferability by earning a C or higher is determined by the college or university.

  • On-Campus Dual Enrollment- Eligible high school juniors and seniors may choose to take approved courses that meet requirements for high school graduation taught on the Reynolds Community College campus in person or virtually while simultaneously earning high school and college credit. Students are responsible for completing all action items related to college course registration and admission and students assume all costs associated with the course. Any courses that students take on a college campus that are not on the approved list are not designated as Dual Enrollment and will not carry high school credit (see Concurrent College Enrollment below). Please see the school counselor for a list of approved courses.

Credit Earned: Students will earn one high school credit for successful completion of six semester hours of college credit and .5 high school credit for successful completion of three semester hours of college credit by supplying their school counselor with an official college transcript prior to the end of the school semester in which the college course is taken. The college course grade will be used in computing the student’s high school grade point average. Students taking an on-campus dual enrollment course as part of the full-enrollment requirement who do not supply an official transcript on time will receive an “F” on the high school transcript for that course. The number of college credits earned is determined by the college or university and may be subject to earning a “C” or higher in the course.

  • On-Campus Dual Enrollment for Career & Technical Education (CTE) – Eligible high school juniors and seniors take identified CTE dual enrollment courses on the college/university campus in person or virtually. This includes Longwood University’s Economics & Personal Finance (FINA150). Program enrollment capacities and any fees associated with the course are set annually.

Credit Earned: Students successfully completing Longwood University’s Economics & Personal Finance (FINA150) will receive 1 high school credit and this college course grade will be used in computing the student’s high school grade point average. The number of college credits earned is determined by the college or university and may be subject to earning a “C” or higher in the course.


Concurrent College Enrollment allows qualified juniors and seniors to enroll in college coursework and pursue college credit independent of high school credit and requirements. Students pursuing concurrent college enrollment are responsible for completing all action items related to college course registration and students assume all costs associated with the course.

Credit Earned: Students do not earn high school credit. The number of college credits earned is determined by the college or university and may be subject to earning a “C” or higher in the course.


*All Advanced Placement (AP) courses, International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (IB DP) courses, and Dual Enrollment courses will be weighted with an additional 1 quality point when calculating the final GPA.

Community Service Learning

Students in grades nine-twelve may participate in voluntary assignments and activities to serve organizations as well as individuals in the community. Students who complete a minimum of 80 hours of community service (50 for the graduating classes of 2022, 2023, 2024, 2025) during grades nine-twelve will receive the Community Service Learning diploma seal on their diploma and transcript notation. Interested students and parents may request information from each school’s community service contact person, or online at henricoschools.us

Comprehensive High Schools

Henrico County high schools offer a rigorous academic core program as well as career and technical education programs to prepare students for higher education and for the workforce. Students have the option to pursue a Standard or Advanced Studies Diploma and to participate in the following academic core programs: Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate/Dual Enrollment/Honors, College Prep (See “Instructional Grouping” in this section). All students may select electives in the fine arts, career and technical education, and general academic areas.

Comprehensive School Health Programs

The Comprehensive School Health Programs include health and physical education, student health services, school counseling, psychological services, nutrition services, family life education, life skills instruction, and related services.

Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)/Class Rank

Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)

A four-point system, based on quality of achievement, is used in computing GPA and class rank for each student.
NOTE: NCAA and/or academic scholarships have specific grade point average requirements. See school counselors and/or coaches for details.

The following formula is used to calculate the cumulative GPA:

Total Grade Points* ÷ Total Credits Attempted

*Total grade points include an additional .5 quality point earned for any Honors and/or International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program (IBMYP) courses and 1.0 quality point earned for any Advanced Placement (AP), Dual Enrollment, and/or International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (IBDP) courses. This is often referred to as “weighting” courses.

Points per Grade Unit =

Letter Grade Percent Grade 4.0 Scale / Quality Points
A+
97-100
4
A
93-96
4
A-
90-92
3.7
B+
87-89
3.3
B
83-86
3
B-
80-82
2.7
C+
77-79
2.3
C
73-76
2
C-
70-72
1.7
D+
67-69
1.3
D
65-66
1
F
Below 65
0
Withdrawn Failing
Not counted in calculation
Withdrawn Passing
Not counted in calculation

Definitions as reflected on the transcript:

Total Grade Points: the sum of (number of credits attempted x Points per Grade Unit)

Total Credits Attempted = total credit of courses taken whether passed or failed

Dropped courses will not appear on the high school transcript under the following circumstances:

  • Any year-long courses dropped on or before the end of the first nine-weeks’ grading period.
  • Any semester courses dropped on or before the fifth Friday from the first day of school. 
  • Any semester courses dropped on or before the fifth Friday from the first day of second semester.

Any courses dropped after the deadlines listed above will result in one of the following on the high school transcript: 

  • “WP” = (Withdrawn Passing): NOT calculated in student GPA. “WP” appears on transcript in place of grade.
  • “WF” = (Withdrawn Failing): NOT calculated in student  GPA. “WF” appears on transcript.

Year-long courses may not be dropped after the first Friday in March.

Semester courses may not be dropped after completion of the first nine-weeks’ grading period of either semester. 

Contact the school counselor for questions regarding GPA calculations.

  • Class Rank

Class rank of individual students is completed uniformly by all high schools. Rank in class shall be computed at the end of the student’s junior year and at the end of the first semester of the student’s senior year. Beginning with the 6th grade class of 2021-22 (graduating cohort of 2027-28) and beyond, grades in high school credit-bearing courses taken in middle school will be computed into the high school grade point average.  Students are ranked numerically, in ascending order, according to GPA. Class rank is computed into a percentile with 0% being the highest and 100% being the lowest. Class rank average will be rounded to four decimal places. All students qualifying for a standard diploma or an advanced studies diploma must be included in determining the class rank. Exceptions include students placed in alternative academic environments. 

NOTE: Only students earning verified credit are included in class rank.

Diploma Seals

Regulations Establishing Standards for Accrediting Public Schools in Virginia contain provisions for awards for exemplary performance for students who meet the requirements for graduation. Students meeting specific requirements for graduation and demonstrating exemplary performance may be eligible for one or more of the following awards:

  1. The Governor’s Seal shall be awarded to students who complete the requirements for an Advanced Studies Diploma with an average grade of “B” or better and successfully complete college-level coursework that will earn the student at least nine transferable college credits in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), Cambridge, or dual enrollment courses.
  2. The Board of Education Seal shall be awarded to students who complete the requirements for a Standard Diploma or Advanced Studies Diploma with an average grade of “A”.
  3. The Board of Education Career and Technical Education Seal will be awarded to students who earn a Standard or Advanced Studies Diploma and complete a prescribed sequence of courses in a career and technical education concentration or specialization that they choose and maintain a “B” or better average in those courses; or (i) pass an examination or an occupational competency assessment in a career and technical education concentration or specialization that confers certification or occupational competency credential from a recognized industry, trade or professional association; or (ii) acquire a professional license in that career and technical education field from the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Board of Education shall approve all professional licenses and examinations used to satisfy these requirements. See The Path to Industry Certification at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/career_technical/path_industry_certification/index.shtml for the current approved licenses and examinations.
  4. The Board of Education Seal for Excellence in Civics Education will be awarded to students who earn either a Standard or Advanced Studies Diploma and: (i) complete Virginia and United States History and Virginia and United States Government courses with a grade of “B” or higher; and, (ii) have good attendance and no disciplinary infractions as determined by local School Board policies and, (iii) complete 50 hours of voluntary participation in community service or extracurricular activities. Activities that would satisfy the requirements of clause (iii) of this subdivision include: (a) volunteering for a charitable or religious organization that provides services to the poor, sick or less fortunate; (b) participating in Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, or similar youth organizations; (c) participating in JROTC; (d) participating in political campaigns or government internships, or Boys State, Girls State, or Model General Assembly; or (e) participating in school-sponsored extracurricular activities that have a civics focus. Any student who enlists in the United States military prior to graduation will be deemed to have met this community service requirement.
  5. The Board of Education Seal of Biliteracy will be awarded to students who earn a Board of Education- approved diploma and pass all required End-of-Course Assessments in English reading and writing at the proficient or higher level. Students will demonstrate proficiency at the intermediate-mid level or higher in one or more languages other than English as demonstrated through an assessment from a list approved by the Superintendent of Public Instruction. American Sign Language qualifies as a language other than English.
  6. The Board of Education’s Seal for Excellence in Science and the Environment (beginning with students entering 9th grade in 2018-2019 and thereafter) will be awarded to students who earn either a Standard Diploma or Advanced Studies Diploma and (i) complete at least three different first- level Board-approved laboratory science courses and at least one rigorous advanced-level or postsecondary- level laboratory science course, each with a grade of “B” or higher; (ii) complete laboratory or field-science research and present that research in a formal, juried setting;and (iii) complete at least 50 hours of voluntary participation in community service or extracurricular activities that involve the application of science such as environmental monitoring, protection, management, or restoration. 
  7. The Board of Education’s Seal for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) shall be awarded to students who earn either a Standard Diploma or an Advanced Studies Diploma and (i) satisfy all Math and Science requirements for the Advanced Studies diploma with a “B” average or better in all course work; and (ii) successfully complete a 50 hour or more work-based learning opportunity in a STEM area; and (iii) satisfy all requirements for a career and technical education concentration (A concentration is a coherent sequence of two or more state-approved courses as identified in the course listing within the CTE Administrative Planning Guide http://www.cteresource.org/apg/) and (iv) pass one of the following: (a) a Board of Education CTE STEM-H credential examination, or (b) an examination approved by the Board that confers a college-level credit in a STEM field.

Students may receive other seals or awards for exceptional academic, career and technical, citizenship, or other exemplary performance in accordance with criteria defined by the local School Board.

Eligibility for Athletic Activities

Middle School Eligibility

To be eligible for athletics, a student must maintain a 2.0 minimum grade point average and pass English, mathematics, science, social studies, and one additional course. Eligibility for fall sports requires that students pass five courses (referenced above) the preceding year; winter sport participants must have passed the five courses at the end of the previous year and at the end of the first semester of the current year if the season goes into second semester; spring sport participants must have passed the five courses at the end of the first semester of the current year. Before practicing, trying out, or becoming a member of any athletic team, the student must submit to the principal an accurate and complete Middle School Athletic Participation/Parental Consent/Physical Examination Form signed by a parent or guardian.

High School Eligibility

To be eligible to participate in interscholastic athletics, a student must maintain a 2.0 minimum grade point average. For athletics and any other performance-related activities sponsored by the Virginia High School League, the student must meet the following requirements:

  • Must be a bona fide student in good standing of the school represented.
  • Must have been promoted to the ninth grade (eighth-grade students may be eligible for junior varsity competition in sports not offered at the middle school level).
  • Must have enrolled no later than the 15th day of the current semester.
  • Must have passed at least five credit courses the preceding year and must be currently taking not fewer than five credit courses for participation during the first semester.
  • Must have passed at least five credit courses the previous semester and must be currently taking no fewer than five credit courses for participation during the second semester.
  • Must not have reached his or her 19th birthday on or before the first of August of the current school year.
  • Must not, after entering the ninth grade for the first time, have been enrolled in or have been eligible for enrollment in high school more than eight consecutive semesters.
  • Must submit to the principal before practicing, trying out, or becoming a member of any school athletic team, a completed High School Athletic Participation/Parental Consent/Physical Examination Form, signed by a parent or guardian. The form attests the student has been examined after May 1 of the previous school year and found to be physically fit for athletic competition and that his or her parents or guardians consent to participation.

Eligibility to participate in interscholastic athletics is a privilege earned by meeting not only the above listed minimum standards, but also all other standards set by the Virginia High School League, district, and school. Students or parents who have questions regarding eligibility or who are in doubt about the effect an activity might have on eligibility should check with the principal or director of student activities.

Examinations

An examination, 100 minutes in length, is given in all high school equivalent courses. For a semester course the examination score counts 8% of the final grade; for a semester dual-enrollment course the examination score counts 20%; for a year-long course the examination score counts 8% of the final grade; for a year-long dual-enrollment course the examination counts 8% (See “Grading Scale” in this section.)

Exceptional Education

Exceptional Education and related services are available for all students with identified disabilities that adversely affect their educational performance. This specially designed instruction is described in the student’s individualized education program (IEP) and is provided to the student in the least restrictive environment. Special education services are available to all students found eligible through an evaluation/eligibility process, and who have an IEP.

Students with disabilities may participate in all school activities. They may earn any type of diploma based on completion of curriculum and assessment requirements and/or individualized programs. (Refer to “Graduation Requirements” in Section I.)

The programs available at Virginia Randolph Education Center (VREC) provide educational services for students with disabilities. The center’s ultimate goal is to have students improve academically and behaviorally to the extent that they can return to their home schools. Programs are provided according to individual student needs as designated in the student’s IEP.

Gifted and Advanced Learners

The following middle and high school services are offered to gifted and other advanced learners:

Grades 6-8

  • Direct gifted services for identified students are provided by Secondary Gifted Resource Teachers assigned to each middle school. Services are provided through the TAG course. Sixth grade gifted students are required to take a gifted enrichment seminar class. Seventh and eighth grade gifted students may take the TAG course and 21st Century Inquiry course.
  • Advanced sections in English provide students the opportunity to examine topics in greater depth and breadth. The grade-level curriculum is modified to include complex learning tasks, variations in pacing, and in-depth independent investigations.
  • Acceleration allows students to take high school credit courses in world history, world language, earth science, mathematics (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II), Art I, Family and Consumer Sciences, Technology Education, and Business and Information Technology.
  • The International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program at Fairfield, Moody, and Tuckahoe Middle Schools cultivates a concept-based, inquiry-driven, student-centered teaching and learning model that emphasizes the importance of a holistic view of knowledge, intercultural awareness, and communication. Students may apply for the program during their fifth or sixth grade year.  
  • The Gifted Young Scholars Academy at Wilder Middle School provides a comprehensive and rigorous interdisciplinary educational opportunity for students in grades six through eight. Students must have a gifted identification in the area of General Intellect by the end of 4th grade to apply. Students must apply during their fifth grade year. Final selection of qualified students is made through a lottery process.

Note: For any high school credit-bearing course taken in middle school, parents may request that grades be omitted from the student’s high school transcript. However, the passing SOL test will be posted on the student’s test results record. The deadline for making such a request is June 30. The student will not earn course credit or verified credit for the course until the course is retaken and passed. Contact the student’s middle school for procedures and more detailed information.

Grades 9-12

  • Access to consultative services through the HCPS Schoology platform, including the opportunity to work with a Gifted Resource Teacher by request.
  • Honors courses that provide advanced challenges in all core content areas
  • Advanced placement courses that provide the means for colleges to grant credit, placement, or both to students who have applied themselves successfully to introductory college level work
  • Dual enrollment courses that provide college level instruction during the school day and opportunities to enter college with credits applicable to a degree program prior to high school graduation
  • International Baccalaureate courses that provide the means for colleges to grant credit, placement, or both
  • Specialty Center programs that address a wide range of student interests (for further information, see “Specialty Center” in this section)
  • Maggie L. Walker Governor’s School for Government & International Studies (For further information, see “Maggie L. Walker Governor’s School” in this section)

Grading Scale and Honor Roll

The grading scale for Henrico County Public Schools (HCPS) is as follows:

Grading Scale

Letter Grade Percent Grade 4.0 Scale / Quality Points
A+
97-100
4
A
93-96
4
A-
90-92
3.7
B+
87-89
3.3
B
83-86
3
B-
80-82
2.7
C+
77-79
2.3
C
73-76
2
C-
70-72
1.7
D+
67-69
1.3
D
65-66
1
F
Below 65
0

HCPS teachers use an electronic grading system to calculate all grades. This system uses standard rounding procedures to determine marking period grades.

Courses with Exam (Non-exempt):

  • Final grades for Semester 1 courses are averaged as Quarter 1 (46%), Quarter 2 (46%), and Final Semester 1 Exam (8%)
  • Final grades for Semester 2 courses are averaged as Quarter 3 (46%), Quarter 4 (46%) and Final Semester 2 Exam (8%).
  • Final grades for year-long courses are averaged as Quarter 1 (23%), Quarter 2 (23%), Quarter 3 (23%), Quarter 4 (23%), and Final Exam (8%).
  • Final grades for year-long dual-enrollment courses are averaged as Quarter 1 (20%), Quarter 2 (20%), First Semester Exam (10%), Quarter 3 (20%), Quarter 4 (20%), and Final Exam (10%).
  • Final grades for Semester 1 dual-enrollment courses are averaged as Quarter 1 (40%), Quarter 2 (40%), and Final Semester 1 Exam (20%).
  • Final grades for Semester 2 dual-enrollment courses are averaged as Quarter 3 (40%), Quarter 4 (40%), and Final Semester 2 Exam (20%).

Courses without Exam (Exempt):

  • Final grades for year-long courses are averaged as Quarter 1 (25%), Quarter 2 (25%), Quarter 3 (25%), Quarter 4 (25%)
  • Final grades for Semester 1 courses averaged as Quarter 1 (50%) and Quarter 2 (50%).
  • Final grades for Semester 2 courses averaged as Quarter 3 (50%) and Quarter 4 (50%).

Guidelines for Honor Roll

Honor Roll is calculated each marking period and each semester as well as for final and cumulative (MP1-MP3) grades. Specific criteria for students’ earning Honor Roll status include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Students must be taking four academic subjects.
  • Students may not have a D or an F in any marking period, semester, final, or cumulative grade.

(Students may have any grade on exams.)

  • Students with an “I” or an “N” in a course will be flagged for consideration at the school level.

I = Incomplete, N = No grade

  • Students’ non home-school courses will be considered in all calculations.
  • Students receiving WP, and WF will be excluded from Honor Roll.
  • Letter grades of S (Satisfactory) or P (Pass) are not considered in Honor Roll calculations.

NOTE: Honor Roll and GPA are calculated differently. Please see a school counselor for Honor Roll calculation information.

Support to Succeed

The School Board of Henrico County is committed to ensuring the success of all students in grades PK – 12. The Board recognizes circumstances may arise that prohibit students from functioning at their highest level. Therefore, “Support to Succeed” has been created to help students understand the impact of failure and how to correct mistakes.

1. Retest After Failure

  • Any student who earns an “F” on a test can remediate with the teacher and opt to be reassessed. The reassessment can be done in a multitude of ways as determined by the teacher. Reassessment methods may include, but are not limited to, taking a different test, submitting a project/alternative assignment or a writing sample, conducting formalized test correction procedure, etc. This re-test procedure does not apply to semester and/or final exams.
  • The student has the responsibility to initiate and follow through on any reassessment opportunities.
  • Henrico County Public Schools will provide an annual notice to students/parents regarding this process and their ability to access it, once approved.
  • The reassessment is graded on student feedback; however, the highest grade attainable to replace the original test grade is 65%.
  • Teachers still have the ability to work with students in other ways to assess and help students to be successful. This is the one common practice that all teachers must follow.

2. Marking Period Failures

In an effort to keep students from becoming discouraged and succumbing to failure, students will have the option to regain the grade based on the remediation plan that is established by the teacher. Once the student has successfully completed the approved remediation plan, the student will then be eligible to receive a grade which will not be lower than 55%.

  • High School – 55% option is either MP1 or MP2; not both.
  • Middle School – 55% option in MP1 and MP2 unless the student is receiving a high school credit.

High Quality Work-Based Learning (HQWBL)

High-Quality Work-Based Learning (HQWBL) comprises school-coordinated workplace experiences related to students’ career goals and/or interests, integrated with instruction, and performed in partnership with local businesses and organizations. HQWBL experiences are available throughout the school year. High-Quality Work-Based Learning experiences include: Job Shadowing, Service Learning, Externship, School-Based Enterprise, *Internship (one credit option), *Entrepreneurship (one credit option),Clinical Experience, *Cooperative Education (one credit otpion), *Youth Registered Apprenticeships (one credit option), Registered Apprenticeship, and *Supervised Agricultural Experience (one credit option).

HQWBL experiences reinforce Virginia’s 5 C’s – critical thinking, collaboration, communication, creative thinking, and citizenship – by allowing students to apply these skills in a real-world business or service-oriented work environment.

  • Collaboration: Work with community members, peers, and mentors
  • Communication: Write and present proposals; make requests and get permissions; publicize and present final project
  • Citizenship: Understand laws and regulations; seek to improve the community; increase community awareness
  • Creativity: Publicize/advertise project; solve problems; present findings
  • Critical Thinking: Develop a project to meet a community need or solve a community problem

Questions regarding HQWBL? Please visit https://henricocte.com/ or contact Sabrina Rabon, Work-Based Learning Coordinator, at sbrabon@henrico.k12.va.us

Homebound/Home-based Program

The Homebound Program provides instructional assistance and support for core academic courses when a medical determination is made that a student is unable to attend classes for a temporary period of time. Homebound support is provided by VA state-licensed teachers. A Medical Certification of Need form and a treatment plan must be completed and signed by a licensed physician, psychiatrist or clinical psychologist and the parent. Please refer to the HCPS Homebound Instruction webpage for details and to download the certification of need form, notice of intent, and homebound instruction handbook.  

Home-based services authorized through an Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team serve as a short-term transitional placement until an appropriate long-term placement can be arranged.

Instructional Grouping

Students are often grouped for instruction in core academic middle and high school courses, specialty center courses, and some elective courses. Grouping is based on a student’s motivation, post-secondary and career goals, prior academic performance, standardized test scores, and recommendations from teachers, parents, and counselors.

Most high schools offer the following levels of grouping:

College Preparatory

      • Rigorous implementation of the Standards of Learning to assure high performance on SOL end-of- course tests (Refer to Standards of Learning (SOL), End-of-Course Tests, Verified Credits, and Substitute Assessments in this section.)
      • College preparatory curriculum designed for students who plan to pursue higher education in liberal arts, fine and performing arts, or in mathematics and science
      • Career preparation emphasizing high performance standards required for successful pursuit of higher education and/or gainful employment (See Career Clusters in Section III.)
      • Independent reading, writing, and short-range and long-range projects required outside of class
      • Emphasis on critical thinking, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation
      • Technical and business-world application of subject matter

Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate/Honors

    • Rigorous coursework designed to challenge the highly motivated and academically gifted/advanced student
    • Independent reading, writing, and long-range projects required outside of class
    • Emphasis on critical thinking skills, higher order analysis, synthesis, and evaluation
    • Preparation for four-year college/university and Advanced Placement and IB Examinations in exit-level courses (See “Advanced Placement Examinations Program” and “IB Diploma Program” in this section.)
    • Development of career awareness through appropriate connections between subject matter and a variety of career options

Note: Advanced Placement, IB Diploma and Honors course numbers will be accompanied by the letter A, Y, Z, or IB on the student request form, report card, and transcript, indicating that a weighted credit is awarded. The letter “X” indicates a Specialty Center course and “XA” indicates a Specialty Center Honors course.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Program

High school students enrolled in an International Baccalaureate Diploma Program and/or Career-related Program will complete mandatory internal assessment in their IB course work and sit for corresponding International Baccalaureate examinations in May of each year.

Students can receive a score of 1 (poor or elementary) to 7 (excellent) for each subject studied. Universities and colleges typically expect individual Higher Level (HL) subject scores to be a minimum of 4 (satisfactory) or sometimes 5 (good) for credit considerations. See the IB Diploma recognition policy at the university’s website to determine course credit. Also consult the university or college website to determine second year enrollment status and scholarship availability for those students earning the IB Diploma.

Language Instruction Educational Program (LIEP)

A LIEP is provided to students who are designated as English Learners (ELs) at proficiency levels of 1–4.3  in grades K-12 in all schools. Newcomer center programs for Level 1 ELs are provided at Brookland Middle School, Quioccasin Middle School, Tuckahoe Middle School and Elko Middle School for Level I ELs from selected middle schools. Newcomer center programs for Level 1 and Level 2 students are provided at Hermitage High School and Highland Springs High School for Level 1 and 2 ELs from selected high schools.

Locally Awarded Verified Credits

Locally Awarded Verified Credits (LAVCs) may be used to satisfy graduation requirements. In order to be eligible for an LAVC:

  • Students must pass the high school course.
  • Students must score 375-399 scale score range on an SOL test after taking the test at least twice. 
  • Students who entered high school prior to fall 2018 may earn 3 LAVCs for the standard diploma and students who entered high school in 2018 and beyond may earn 1 LAVC for the standard or advanced diploma. (Credit accommodations for students with disabilities do not count toward this count.)
  • Students with disabilities may earn unlimited LAVCs as credit accommodation. Credit accommodations must be addressed in the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP).
  • Students with disabilities are eligible for Special Permission LAVCs (SPLAVC). The student must have passed the SOL course without modified curriculum, and scored below a 375 on the SOL. Students with disabilities must meet requirements stated in the Eligibility Criteria Request for Review and follow the school division’s LAVC appeal process. Credit accommodations must be addressed in the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP).

Maggie L. Walker Governor's School for Government and International Studies (MLWGS)

This regional high school offers an advanced college preparatory curriculum emphasizing government, international studies, world languages, science, mathematics, and fine arts as well as opportunities for international learning experiences. Eighth-grade students residing in Henrico County are selected on a competitive basis through an application process beginning mid-October through mid-March. Students are eligible to apply if they meet the following criteria:

  • Reside in Henrico County, Virginia,
  • Be enrolled in Algebra I or a higher-level math course during the eighth grade year and successfully pass the course for high school credit,
  • Have a B average according to Henrico County Public Schools grading scale for the four core subjects at the end of the seventh grade year. Students who do not have a B average, but would like to be considered as an applicant due to special circumstances, must provide a letter of explanation to the Educational Specialist for Gifted Education Programs, Henrico County Public Schools.

To ensure regional representation at each public middle school, the HCPS internal selection process has two phases. For phase one, HCPS will establish an applicant pool based on the composite score from the MLWGS regional application evaluation process. HCPS will offer admission to the top two qualifying applicants from each public middle school that meets the regional established cut-off score in that pool. During phase two, the remaining slots will be offered to applicants based on the numerical rank from the MLWGS composite score  from highest to lowest. Applicants participating in a special program such as the IB Program, Gifted Young Scholars Academy, or out of zone program will be considered with the public middle school they attend in eighth grade. All home-school or private school applicants will be considered in phase two of the selection process.

Admission handbooks and applications will be available beginning the middle of October with an application deadline in early December. Eligible eighth grade students enrolled in Henrico County Public Schools are invited to apply. Eighth grade students residing in Henrico County and not enrolled in public schools should contact the Educational Specialist, Gifted Education Programs, Henrico County Public Schools, (804) 226-5126. For additional information, please visit Henrico’s Governor’s School site at:  https://sites.google.com/henrico.k12.va.us/gs2022/home and the Maggie L. Walker Governor’s School site at www.gsgis.k12.va.us

Military Science/JROTC

Military Science/JROTC is offered at six high schools. Marine Corps JROTC is offered at Hermitage, Highland Springs, and J. R. Tucker. Naval JROTC is offered at Henrico and Varina, and Air Force JROTC is offered at Deep Run. (See Section VI, Course Descriptions)

NCAA Eligibility Center for College-Bound Athletes

Students who plan to participate as college freshmen in Division I or II athletic programs must register and be certified by the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Eligibility Center. Please go to http://www.ncaa. org for the most up-to-date information regarding registering online and paying fees. Students should specifically review core course requirements, SAT/ACT requirements, recruiting rules and amateur status. There are specific GPA/SAT/ACT requirements for scholarships. See your school counselor for more information.

Checklist for College-Bound Student Athletes:

  • Complete the registration process with the NCAA Eligibility Center at the beginning of your junior year at

http://ncaaeligibilitycenter.org

  • Ask your school counselor to send your transcript to the Eligibility Center at the end of your junior year
  • Take the ACT or SAT and use code 9999 to have scores sent directly to Eligibility Center
  • Request final amateurism certification during your senior year
  • Ask your high school counselor to submit your final transcript with proof of graduation

Number of Credits Per Year

  • Students may not audit a class.
  • Students may not enroll in more than eight credits per school year without principal approval.

Number of Periods Per Day

All students shall maintain a full-day schedule of at least 6 classes (middle school) and 7 classes (high school) unless (1) the student is enrolled in a cooperative work/ apprenticeship program or (2) the Superintendent of Schools or the Superintendent’s designee grants the student a waiver.

Promotion Policies

Middle School

To qualify for promotion between middle school grades, or from middle school to high school, students must earn a passing final grade in the four core subject areas of English, mathematics, science and social studies. Students who fail one or more core subjects are retained and recommended to attend summer school to retake the failed courses. If the student does not attend summer school, they will be retained.

High School

Satisfactory completion of courses that meet graduation requirements determines promotion or retention on a course-by-course basis.

The requirements for classification of a student at specific grade levels are indicated below:

Tenth Grade –
A student must have earned a minimum of five credits, three of which must be from the disciplines of English, social studies, mathematics, science, physical education, or economics and personal finance.

Eleventh Grade –
A student must have earned a minimum of 10 credits, six of which must be from the disciplines of English, social studies, mathematics, science, physical education, or economics and personal finance.

Twelfth Grade –
A student must have earned 15 credits, 10 of which must be from the disciplines of English, social studies, mathematics, science, physical education, or economics and personal finance.

Repeating a Course For Strength

Students may re-enroll in a sequential class that they have already passed with permission from the school* to retake the course. Both course attempts and grades are listed on the high school transcript; only the higher grade of both course attempts is calculated into the GPA and only one credit is awarded for the same course, despite multiple attempts. 

*Permission may vary by school and depends on a variety of factors, including student request, staffing allocations, class capacity, etc.

School Counseling

School counseling is a data-driven, comprehensive program designed to provide the knowledge, skills and attitudes all students need to achieve academic success, college and career readiness, social/emotional development and mental wellness. The primary task of the school counselor is to provide direct counseling services to all students aimed at removing barriers to student success and improving student outcomes through the delivery of preventative counseling curriculum, individual counseling, small group counseling, crisis counseling, academic appraisal and advisement, consultation, collaboration and referral.  

School & Parent/Guardian Communication on Student Progress

The school year is divided into quarters of nine weeks each; every student receives a report card following each quarter. Parents/Guardians are encouraged to participate in the PowerSchool Parent Portal to see student progress. In addition, parents/guardians have opportunities for conferences and telephone and/or e-mail contacts. Appointments are recommended for conferences.

Sequential Electives

Sequential electives are any series of courses that are used to fulfill the elective requirements for a Standard or Advanced Studies diploma in which the content increases or expands in scope and sequence as students move through various levels of the course. Per the VDOE:

  1. The two sequential electives may be in any content area as long as the courses are not specifically required for graduation.
  2. Notwithstanding item 1 above, a fine arts or career and technical education course used to satisfy the “World Language, Fine Arts or Career & Technical Education” requirement for the Standard diploma, or the “Fine Arts or Career & Technical Education” requirement for the Advanced Studies diploma may be used to partially satisfy this requirement. 
    1. For students seeking to graduate with a Standard of Advanced Studies diploma in the 2021-2022 or 2022-2023 cohorts, a World Language course used to satisfy the degree requirements listed in item 2 above may be used to partially satisfy the sequential elective requirement, so long as the total number of required credits for the diploma are achieved. 
  3. A sequence that includes an exploratory course followed by an introductory course cannot be used to satisfy this requirement; however, an introductory course followed by another level of the same course of study in any content area can be used.
  4. A two-credit course, regardless of content and as long as the courses are not specifically required for graduation, can fulfill the sequential elective graduation requirement if course content builds on itself and creates a foundation for further education or training or preparation for employment.
  5. Students may take the focused sequence of elective courses in consecutive years or any two years of high school.

Specialty Centers

Specialty Centers, located in all Henrico County Public Schools comprehensive high schools and four middle schools, offer unique choices for HCPS students who have specific educational and/or career goals. Specialty Centers, which also include the Advanced Career Education (ACE) Centers, provide opportunities for students to concentrate on specialized interests or skill-based programs. Detailed information about all 17 HCPS Specialty Centers, application processes and timelines is available at https://henricoschools.us/specialty-centers/

Students who wish to complete a rigorous college-preparatory program in addition to concentration on a specialized interest will have access to information about the Centers in their 8th grade year. Information sessions and open houses during the first semester provide in-depth information about Center curriculum and the application process, and students must apply to Centers in their eighth grade year*. Students who are accepted and choose to attend one of these Specialty Centers will become full- time students at the high school which houses the Center; however, students who withdraw from a Specialty Center prior to their junior year will return to their home school to complete their remaining high school years. 

Ninth and tenth grade students who wish to prepare for job-entry skills and/or post-secondary education should be in a rigorous core curriculum cluster at their home high school to prepare for 3-credit technical courses during their junior and senior years. All Advanced Career Education (ACE) Center programs lead to licensure or certification upon successful completion. Admission is through an application process, and Henrico County Public Schools has three ACE Centers; Hermitage High School, Highland Springs High School, and on the campus of Virginia Randolph.  

– For IBMYP at the middle school level, students must apply during their fifth, sixth or seventh grade year.

Standard Credit and Verified Credit

A standard credit or standard unit of credit is awarded for a high school credit-bearing course in which a student successfully completes 140 clock hours of instruction and the requirements/objectives of the course as evidenced by a passing grade. Local school boards may develop alternatives to the requirement for 140 clock hours of instruction as provided in 8VAC20-131-110 and in accordance with board guidelines.

A verified credit or a verified unit of credit is awarded for a course in which the student earns a standard credit and achieves a passing score on a corresponding end-of-course SOL test or a substitute assessment approved by the Board of Education.
Note: In the circumstance that a parent/guardian requests that the grades/standard credit of a high school credit-bearing course taken in middle school be omitted from a student’s high school transcript, the passing SOL test will remain posted on a student’s test results record. The student may not need to retake the SOL test already passed and may earn both the standard and verified credits for the course once the course is retaken and passed in high school.

Standards of Learning (SOL), End-of-Course Tests, and Substitute Assessments for High School Credit-Bearing Courses

The State of Virginia has established a set of K-12 subject-area Standards of Learning (SOL) with corresponding grade level and end-of-course SOL tests. These SOLs are incorporated in the Secondary pacing guides found on the Henrico County Public Schools website. All middle school students enrolled in applicable high school credit-bearing courses are required to take corresponding end-of-course SOL tests. Students in high school will take end-of-course SOL tests based on their individual graduation requirements and federal participation guidelines.

Remediation opportunities (before, after, during school and summer school) will be provided in certain subject areas for students failing one or more of the Standards of Learning tests (SOL tests). Students and parents should check with principals in selecting appropriate programs.

HCPS administers End-of-Course SOL tests upon completion of the following courses:

Course Title(s) and Number End of Course SOL Test adminstered
English 11 (1150)

AP English Language Composition (1196)

JSRCC College Composition 111 & 112

Reading

Algebra I (3130)

IBMYP Algebra I (IB3130)

Algebra I

PSC Geometry (3143)

Engineering Math I (3343)

Research Analytics Geometry (3243)

IBMYP Geometry (IB3143)

Geometry

Algebra II (3135)

Engineering Math II (3333)

Research Analytics Algebra (3233)

IBMYP Algebra II (IB3135)

Algebra II

Earth Science (4210)

Environmental Science (4270)

Earth Science

Biology (4310)

ESL Biology (4312)

Medical Biology (4610)

IBMYP Biology (IB4310)

Biology

Chemistry (4410)

IB MYP Chemistry (4480 & 4490)

Medical Chemistry (4612)

VCU Chemistry (4410)

Chemistry

World Geography (2210)

AP Human Geography (2212)

World Geography

World History & Geography I (2215)

IBMYP World History & Geography I, Level Three (IB2215)

World History & Geography I (to 1500)

World History & Geography II (2216)

IBMYP World History & Geography II, Level Four (IB2216)

World History & Geography II (1500-present)

VA & US History (2360)

AP VA & US History (2319)

IDBP History of the Americas (IB2360)

JSRCC US History 121 & 122 (2319)

VA & US History

Substitute Assessments (For SOL Tests)

The State Board of Education has approved various tests which may substitute for certain SOL tests. See the DOE website https://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/substitute_tests/subtests-verified-credit.pdf for current listings and minimum acceptable scores.

Student Activities

Students are encouraged to explore interests and to participate in student activities that tend to promote and build self-esteem, character, and leadership qualities. Numerous opportunities available for students to excel in activities beyond the classroom include the following:

  • athletics
  • performing groups
  • intramural activities
  • academic competitions
  • co-curricular organizations
  • honorary societies
  • community service
  • service clubs 
  • publications
  • interest clubs

For additional info please check the school’s website.

Summer Programs

Henrico County Public Schools provides a variety of educational opportunities  for students during the summer. A comprehensive summer school program either in person or online is offered to all HCPS students (elementary, middle, and high).  Career awareness programs for both middle and high school students are also offered at both ACE Centers. Tuition may be is required for some summer most courses. Information concerning possible financial assistance is available through each school’s principal. 

Summer remediation opportunities are provided for students who failed one or more of their end-of-course Standards of Learning (SOL) tests or the W!SE examination. All schools have the appropriate forms and information for registration and enrollment of students. 

Testing Program

An overview of division-wide standardized tests and local assessments

Testing is an essential part of a student’s education. State-mandated test scores are a part of the student’s school record and can help students, parents, teachers, and administrators determine students’ strengths.

Standardized tests may be administered to middle and high school students through the Department of Assessment, Research, and Evaluation.

Unique to HCPS is the annual opportunity for all ninth grade students to take CollegeBoard’s PSAT 8/9 and all tenth grade students to take CollegeBoard’s PSAT/NMSQT, free of charge.  CollegeBoard’s PSAT-NMSQT is the qualifying test for the National Merit Scholarship as well as a number of additional scholarships, and is available each fall to any eleventh grade student who would like to pay the associated CollegeBoard fee.  

Henrico County Public Schools also administers local assessments/simulation assessments correlated to the Standards of Learning in the core content area.

Transfer Students

In alignment with the VDOE Standards of Accreditation, HCPS accept standard credits towards graduation received from Virginia nonpublic schools accredited by one of the approved accrediting constituent members of the Virginia Council for Private Education (VCPE), and these schools/programs can be located on the VCPE School Locator. Additionally, HCPS accepts credits from VA Approved Multi-Division Online Providers (MOPs), as well as Virtual Virginia, other Virginia public schools, and state-operated programs. If none of these apply, HCPS may request additional information for consideration (academic records, course syllabus, pacing guide, curriculum, assessments, assignments, etc.) so that a content area specialist may conduct a review and evaluate/determine if the course generally matches the description of or can be substituted for courses for which HCPS gives standard credit. 

Standard units of credit also shall be accepted for courses satisfactorily completed in accredited colleges and universities when prior written approval of the principal has been granted or the student has been given credit by the previous school attended. 

Special circumstances may be considered for first time transfers regarding meeting graduation requirements earning verified credits. Please contact your school counselor with additional questions.